Australia & New Zealand
...

Australia - Rate hikes will result in housing downturn

High household debt will magnify the impact of interest rate hikes on the housing market and we now expect prices across the eight capital cities to fall by 5% from H2 2023. The upshot is that the RBA is unlikely to hike rates as sharply as the financial markets anticipate and may end up easing policy in 2024.
Marcel Thieliant Senior Japan, Australia & New Zealand Economist
Continue reading

More from Australia & New Zealand

Australia & New Zealand Economics Weekly

Australia’s consumer exuberance won’t last

The strong rebound in consumer spending in November is consistent with our view that GDP surpassed its pre-lockdown peak in Q4 already. And while the Omicron tsunami seems to have resulted in a renewed slowdown in consumption, mounting staff shortages and disruptions to goods supply will result in continued strong increases in consumer prices. The upshot is that we still expect the RBA to end its bond purchases in three weeks, though the sluggishness in wage growth means we don’t expect the first rate hike until early next year.

14 January 2022

Australia & New Zealand Economics Focus

Housing downturn will lead to RBNZ rate cuts in 2023

While the strength in New Zealand’s economy will cause the RBNZ to hike rates further this year, we think the RBNZ will end its hiking cycle earlier than the financial markets anticipate. What’s more, we think a housing downturn in 2022 will weigh on the economy at the same time as inflation is easing and the labour market is loosening. On that basis we expect the RBNZ to cut rates in 2023. Drop-In: Neil Shearing will host an online panel of our senior economists to answer your questions and update on macro and markets this Thursday, 13th January (11:00 ET/16:00 GMT). Register for the latest on everything from Omicron to the Fed to our key calls for 2022. Registration here.

12 January 2022

Australia & New Zealand Data Response

Australia - Retail Sales/External Trade (Nov. 2021)

November’s data support our view that GDP will surpass its pre-delta level in Q4. But while the strength in retail sales is set to fade in the months ahead as Omicron weighs on consumption, the likely drag from net trade to GDP growth in Q4 is also likely to reverse in Q1.

11 January 2022

More from Marcel Thieliant

Japan Economics Update

Bank of Japan not losing control of money market

Media reports that suggest that the Bank of Japan is losing control of short-term interest rates due to its “Special Deposit Facility” encouraging banks to park reserves at the BoJ are wide of the mark. The scheme does not threaten the viability of the BoJ’s negative interest rate policy.

22 November 2021

Japan Economics Weekly

More cash handouts on the way

The latest survey data suggest that consumer spending is still struggling to gain momentum even as the bulk of the population are fully vaccinated and virus cases have plunged. However, with car sales now rebounding sharply as supply disruptions are easing and spending set to get another shot in the arm from the government’s cash handouts, we still expect consumption to surpass its pre-virus level by early next year.

12 November 2021

Australia & New Zealand Economics Update

RBA recapitalisation would lift public debt

Rising interest rates will result in the RBA making further losses in the years ahead. The Bank’s existing reserves should be enough to absorb those losses in a benign scenario, but the Bank will stop paying a dividend. And in a worst-case scenario, the Treasury may inject capital of as much as 5% of GDP.

9 November 2021
↑ Back to top